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Reading in the Curriculum

The way we teach reading at Christ the King Catholic Primary School.
In Foundation 2 (F2), we then introduce new letter/sounds each week. Each letter has an action with a song and a picture to show the letter shape . An explanation of these actions is included. The letters are introduced in a certain order, so the children can begin to read and spell words straight away. The order is as follows:

Set 1 s, a, t, p
Set 2 i, n, m, d
Set 3 g, o, c, k
Set 4 ck, e, u, r
Set 5 h, b, f, ff, l, ll,  ss
Set 6 j, v, w, x
Set 7 y, z, zz, qu

Consonant diagraphs: ch, sh, th, ng

Vowel diagraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, oo ,ar, ur, ow, oi, air, ure, er

Within Key Stage 1 children have daily phonics sessions where phonics and reading  are taught in six distinct phases ( see link below). These phases are set out in the Letters and Sounds document. The children’s reading book will be linked to our phonics scheme and will reflect the phase that your child is working , within the classroom. Reading is taught throughout the school in a guided reading session, which takes place outside the Literacy lesson. This is where the teacher reads with a small group of children to teach further reading skills such as reading on, looking at pictures, sounding out unfamiliar words. The teacher uses these sessions to question children’s understanding of what they have read and to model how to read.

We have a range of books for the children to read covering a wide variety of genres. The books are all leveled according to national curriculum levels so the children will be reading a book that is appropriately matched to their reading ability. These books are then sent home for the children to share . It is important that the children read aloud to somebody at home two - three times a week, as they all need to practise the skill of reading aloud regardless of their age.

At Christ the King Catholic Primary School, our teaching is based around the individual child; whilst we consider what the broad national ‘average’ would be, we also very closely consider personal targets and rates of progress. For example, a very able child is challenged to carry out work in a different way or at a different level. This way, all our pupils are expected to make good progress and achieve their potential. Similarly a child who is struggling is still set challenging targets but will be given extra support from the class teacher or teaching assistant to help them achieve their target. Some key characteristics of the different levels of reading are shown below. You can use these to support your child at home when reading together.

Phonics Phases
Phase 1

Showing an awareness of rhyme and alliteration.
Distinguishing between sounds in the environment and phonemes.
Exploring and experimenting with sounds and words.
Beginning to orally blend and segment

Phase 2
Learning graphemes

Set 1 s, a, t, p
Set 2 i, n, m, d
Set 3 g, o, c, k
Set 4 ck, e, u, r
Set 5 h, b, f, ff, l, ll,  ss

Phase 3
Learning one grapheme for each of the 43 phonemes we have in English
Set 6 j, v, w, x
Set 7 y, z, zz, qu
Set 6 j, v, w, x
Set 7 y, z, zz, qu
Consonant diagraphs: ch, sh, th, ng
Vowel diagraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, oo ,ar, ur, ow, oi, air, ure, er

Phase 4
This is a consolidation unit.
Reading of spelling and tricky words continues.
Segmenting adjacent consonants in words and applying this in spelling
Blending adjacent consonants in words and applying this skill when reading unfamiliar texts.

Phase 5
Graphemes: ay, ou, ie, ea, oy, ir, ue, aw ,wh, ph, ew, oe, au, a-e, e-e, i-e, o-e, u-e
Alternative graphemes for i, o, c, g, u, ie, ow, ea, er, a, y, ch, ou

Phase 6​
Recognising phonic irregularities and becoming more secure with less common grapheme- phoneme correspondences.

Applying phonic skills and knowledge to recognize and spell increasing number of complex words.

Key Characteristics of Reading
Working at the expected standard in Year 1:

Children should be able to:

Identify the main events and characters in stories, and find specific information in simple texts

Make predictions showing an understanding of ideas, events and characters

Recognise the main elements that shape different texts eg lists, comic strips with speech in bubbles, ‘once upon a time’ to show the start of a fairy tale

Explore the effect of patterns of language and repeated words and phrases

Select books for personal reading and give reasons for their choices

Visualise and comment on events, characters and ideas, making imaginative links to their own experiences

Distinguish fiction and non-fiction texts and the different purposes for reading them

Working at the expected standard in Year 2:​
Children should be able to:

Identify the main events and characters in stories, and find specific information in simple texts

Make predictions showing an understanding of ideas, events and characters

Recognise the main elements that shape different texts eg lists, comic strips with speech in bubbles, ‘once upon a time’ to show the start of a fairy tale

Explore the effect of patterns of language and repeated words and phrases

Select books for personal reading and give reasons for their choices

Visualise and comment on events, characters and ideas, making imaginative links to their own experiences

Distinguish fiction and non-fiction texts and the different purposes for reading them

Working at the expected standard in Year 3 and Year 4:
Children should be able to:

Work out a character’s reasons for behaviour from their actions eg why did the character start to shiver?

Explain how ideas are developed in non-fiction texts eg what was this section all about and how was it different to this section?

In non-fiction texts, use knowledge of different organisational features of texts to find information effectively

eg use headings and sub-headings, captions and the index

In fiction texts, explain how writers use language to create images and atmosphere

eg why did the writer describe the dog as ‘bouncing around like a ball’?

Read extensively favourite authors or genres and experiment with other types of text

Explore why and how writers write eg through online contact with authors (check out Jeremy Strong’s website, or the official Horrid Henry one!)

Working at the expected standard in Year 5:
Children should be able to:

Understand underlying themes, causes and points of view

Recognise different ways to argue, persuade, mislead and sway the reader eg read some promotional leaflets and the websites before you go on a day-trip to a theme park or museum!

Compare different types of narrative and information texts and identify how they are structured

eg compare different instructions, compare the clever ways Jacqueline Wilson structures her stories

Explore how writers use language for different effects

eg why did the writer repeat this word?
eg why did the writer describe the character’s palms sweating?

Read extensively and discuss personal reading with others – this is one of the reasons why reading aloud and sharing ideas with others is important, even for older children (why not encourage a reading group with your child and family / friends!)

Compare how writers present experiences and use language eg compare the Horrid Histories series (Vile Victorians, for example) with a typical non-fiction book and even a fictional story set in Victorian times

Working at the expected standard in Year 6;
Typically, children can continue to develop the areas suggested for Year 5, but at a deeper level and for more challenging texts.

eg Children able to understand underlying themes, causes and points of view should begin to ‘read between the lines’ and find evidence for their interpretation.

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